If a tenant has breached a rule or covenant which is evident in the agreement, not including late payment of rent, you must notify your tenant of said breach in writing and shall wait at least seven days after the notice has been given for the breach to be remedied or corrected. The notice must state the rule allegedly breached; that if the breach isn’t remedied within seven days, you, the landlord, will bring an action for summary possession; that the notice is given pursuant to 25 Del.C. § 5513; and that if a similar breach is committed within a year, the notice serves as grounds for initiating an action of summary possession. In addition, if the breach could be remedied by you (, you may fix the breach and bill your tenant the costs for such a remedy, due upon the next payment of rent. Finally, if your tenant’s breach breaks a municipal, county, or state code, ordinance, or statute, you may immediately terminate the agreement and bring an action for summary possession.

If a breach by your tenant causes or threatens to cause irreparable harm to any person or any property, or your tenant is convicted of a class A misdemeanor or felony during the term of the tenancy which caused or threatened to cause irreparable harm to any person or property, you may do either or both of the following: without notice, remedy the breach and bill your tenant as provided in the above section, or immediately terminate this agreement upon notice to the tenant and bring an action for summary possession.