Lease agreements will contain specific timeframes for providing notices to the tenant, and likewise for the tenant to provide a variety of notices to the landlord. In many states, failing to provide proper notices negates certain rights conveyed to either the landlord or the tenant, and this information will be outlined in a state’s statutes.

Notice For Entry

As with all states, in Florida a landlord may enter the premises when necessary under certain conditions:

  • with Tenant’s consent;
  • in case of emergency;
  • if Tenant unreasonably withholds consent; or
  • if Tenant is absent from the Premises for at least 15 days.
A landlord in Florida must provide 12 hours notice to the tenant before entering the premises for purposes of a repair.

However, if the rent is current and the tenant notifies the landlord in advance of an intended absence, then the landlord can enter only with the consent of the tenant for the protection or preservation of the premises. Unlike many states with longer notice requirements, a landlord in Florida must provide 12 hours notice to the tenant before entering the premises for purposes of a repair, and must only enter between 7:30 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.

Notice for Move-out Inspection

Interestingly, Florida has no stipulation in its property statutes for providing a notice for a move-out inspection. So while it may be more convenient to just do the move-out inspection at the landlord’s convenience, scheduling the inspection so that the departing tenant can be available (or at a minimum providing the option to be available) will work in your favor, especially if there is a dispute about deductions from the security deposit.

Notices for Termination

If you’re a landlord in Florida and you wish to terminate a lease agreement due to non-payment of rent the required notice period is three days, including weekend days and holidays. In addition, the notice you provide to the tenant must contain some specific language regarding the termination. That language is specified in the Florida statutes, Title VI of Civil Practice and Procedure, Chapter 83.56.