As tempting as it may be for a renter, making alterations to a rental property or taking on repairs is almost always not a good idea. In fact, a lease agreement will state that the tenant may not make repairs or alterations without the prior written consent of the landlord and any homeowner’s association, if applicable. Examples of repairs and alterations are painting, wallpapering, demolition, carpentry, and installation of fixtures (new cabinet handles, anyone?). Also included are new locks and burglar alarm systems. If the tenant installs new locks they must provide landlord with a key. In the case where the landlord does provide permission for repairs or alterations any work done must conform to a professional standard of quality. In addition, repairs and alterations become the property of the landlord with no compensation to the tenant.

Landlord's Right to Access

If repairs need to be made to the rental property the landlord will typically make those repairs himself or arrange for a third party to handle the repairs. The landlord has a statutory right to access the rental property to make repairs or alterations and for any of the following reasons.

  • to inspect the premises and determine tenant’s compliance with the terms of the rental agreement
  • to show the premises to a prospective tenant, purchaser, or lender
  • to estimate repair costs
  • to prevent waste
  • to prevent excessive noise or disturbances
Georgia law does not specify the time period that landlords must give tenants to enter for non-emergency reasons.

Georgia law does not specify the time period that landlords must give tenants to enter for non-emergency reasons, but 24 hours is a good place to start. LeaseRunner’s Georgia lease uses the 24 hour time period as a default, but remember that each situation is different and you can always request a different time period. It is a good practice to provide notice in writing, and once you are finished in the unit make sure to indicate the time that you left the unit.