There are an endless number of examples of renters feeling so at home in a rental that they decide to make alterations to the premises. However, it’s almost never a good idea for a renter to repair or alter the unit on their own. In fact, a lease agreement will state that the tenant may not make repairs or alterations without the prior written consent of the landlord and any homeowner’s association, if applicable.

Mold Remediation

The period of time for vacating must not exceed 30 days, and the landlord must either provide a comparable dwelling unit, or arrange for a hotel room, in both cases at no expense or cost to the tenant.

The existence of mold can pose a serious threat to the health of the inhabitants of a rental unit. Virginia law has some provisions for dealing with mold in rental units. Virginia Code § 55-248.18:2 states that where a mold condition in the premises materially affects the health or safety of any tenant or authorized occupant, the landlord may require the tenant to temporarily vacate the premises so that mold remediation can be performed. The period of time for vacating must not exceed 30 days, and the landlord must either provide a comparable dwelling unit, or arrange for a hotel room, in both cases at no expense or cost to the tenant. During the time that the tenant is temporarily relocated they are still responsible for paying rent. Of course, the burden of paying for the mold remediation is on the landlord, unless the mold is a result of the tenant’s failure to comply with their stated maintenance responsibilities.